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2017 Law Journal for Social Justice Symposium

The 2017 Law Journal for Social Justice Symposium, “Criminal Justice System Reform” focused on mandatory minimums, mass incarceration, and issues in policing in two panels moderated by Professor Charles Calleros and former Phoenix Mayor and former Attorney General of Arizona Terry Goddard.  Panelists included Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery, State Senator Martin Quezada, Federal Public... Continue Reading →

Charter Schools and the Resurgence of ‘SEPARATE BUT EQUAL’

By Michael Gorelik “We conclude that in the field of public education the doctrine of ‘separate but equal’ has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.” This year marks the 63rd anniversary of the United States Supreme Court striking down the nation’s “separate but equal” doctrine in the landmark segregation case, Brown v. Board of... Continue Reading →

Native American Mascot Controversy

By: Danielle Ser Native American tribal leaders, members, and their families have suffered immensely throughout history, facing forced relocation to desolate reservations, desecration of sacred sites, and a mascot controversy where names and symbols are used to offensively represent professional and non-professional sports teams.  Take for example the Washington Redskins, the Florida State Seminoles, or... Continue Reading →

Will the Passage of Prop 206 Help Reduce Poverty in Arizona?

By: Robert Buddingh In the November 2016 general election, Arizona voters approved Proposition 206.[1] Along with mandating employers to guarantee paid sick time to their employees, this measure will annually increase the minimum wage during the start of the next four years.[2] The current minimum wage in Arizona in 2016 is $8.05 per hour and... Continue Reading →

A Debtors Dilemma

By: Tiffany Setters Having successfully trekked through the long, arduous years of law school, an attorney is most likely aware of what constitutes basic debtors’ rights.  For instance, they likely know that a creditor should refrain from showing up at a debtor’s door while ostentatiously handling a baseball bat, cracking his or her knuckles, and... Continue Reading →

School Voucher Systems May Increase Segregation of Students by Ability

By: Katherine Montgomery School voucher systems have increased in popularity in the last decade and will continue to expand if Betsy DeVos becomes Secretary of Education.[1] Programs differ by state, some only offer scholarships to a small subset of school-age children, while other programs give money directly to the parents for any school related charge.... Continue Reading →

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