The Subtle Preservation of Oppression

By: Alexis Eisa The will of the people, protest rights, and progression are considered the fundamental bedrocks of democratic societies. Notably, customary international law, or general principles of law that are binding on every state (regardless of its adherence) and several international law instruments dictate that states must have the will of the people serve … Continue reading The Subtle Preservation of Oppression

Low Unemployment and New Jobs Cannot Compensate for Low Wages, Housing Crisis

By: Fallon Cochlin With inflation through the roof and talk of a potential recession on the horizon, to say that times are tough for Arizonans is an understatement. The rising cost of living, including housing, gas, and groceries, has worsened the financial anxiety that families face each day. Some recent reports suggest that not all … Continue reading Low Unemployment and New Jobs Cannot Compensate for Low Wages, Housing Crisis

Fear and Loathing (of Trans People) in Arkansas

By: Gillian Grant Just three months into 2023 and state legislatures throughout the country have already introduced nearly 400 anti-LGBTQ bills. Most of the bills specifically target trans communities by limiting access to healthcare, athletics, affirming school environments, and public accommodations. One particularly egregious example is Arkansas’s S.B. 270, which passed the Arkansas Senate on … Continue reading Fear and Loathing (of Trans People) in Arkansas

Private prisons: a judicial hole in the ADA

By: Ben Smart Despite the Supreme Court ruling that section II of the American with Disabilities Act applies in state prisons, circuit courts have ruled that the ADA will not apply in private prisons. This hole in protection could be patched either judicially, where the exception was created, or legislatively. Section II of the ADA … Continue reading Private prisons: a judicial hole in the ADA

Seek (death) and you shall receive? The right to die vs. the right to kill: A Closer Look at the Aaron Gunches’ execution request

By: Olivia Li “The right to die is not synonymous with the right to kill”; “to allow a defendant to choose his own sentence introduces unconscionable arbitrariness into the capital punishment system” -Judge Harry Pregerson, Dissent in Comer v. Schriro In November 2022, Aaron Brian Gunches, a prisoner on Arizona’s death row, volunteered to be … Continue reading Seek (death) and you shall receive? The right to die vs. the right to kill: A Closer Look at the Aaron Gunches’ execution request