The Smart and Safe Arizona Act: How a Progressive Statute Punishes the Formerly Convicted Even in Expungement

By: Tor Hawley On November 3, 2020 Arizona voters historically passed Prop 207 which would decriminalize marijuana in a number of meaningful ways. [1] While the statute will benefit the state budget, schools, dispensary owners, and recreational use, the statute is most progressive in its expungement offer. [2] Beginning July 12, 2021 persons previously charged … Continue reading The Smart and Safe Arizona Act: How a Progressive Statute Punishes the Formerly Convicted Even in Expungement

What Justice is there for those Wrongfully Convicted?

By: Bryan Shapiro The future of those convicted of a crime is one of added pressure and constraints from society. With restrictions on the right to vote, to the right to defend yourself with a firearm, and even where to live, those convicted of crime face hardship at every corner as they are reentering society. … Continue reading What Justice is there for those Wrongfully Convicted?

Employment Rights for Employees

By: Kelsey Whalen Every state, with the exception of Montana, has an employment at-will presumption. Employment at-will means an employee can be terminated at any time for any reason (except an illegal reason) or for no reason at all. Employees may also quit at any time without providing notice. Additionally, laws have been implemented that … Continue reading Employment Rights for Employees

Decriminalization: Rethinking the War on Drugs

By: Dayna Rauliuk One out of five people in prison or jail are locked up for a drug offense, and on any given day almost half a million people are incarcerated for non-violent drug offenses. In 1971, President Nixon declared a war on drugs, which led to the establishment of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) … Continue reading Decriminalization: Rethinking the War on Drugs

A New Era of Batson Reform: Closing the Legal Loophole of Racial Discrimination in Jury Selection for Good

By: Natalie Kilker               As jurors are seated in the long-anticipated trial of Derek Chauvin – charged with second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and manslaughter – in response to his deadly encounter with George Floyd that sparked a nation-wide reckoning on racism and police brutality, special attention is being paid to the voir dire in Minneapolis. … Continue reading A New Era of Batson Reform: Closing the Legal Loophole of Racial Discrimination in Jury Selection for Good