Views on Climate Change Not as Cloudy with Biden Administration

By: Brandon Macken National energy policy was a key issue in the 2020 Presidential Election. As scientists release more statistical data about the effects of global warming on our environment, the United States has called upon the rest of the world to act. John Kerry, United States Special Presidential Envoy for Climate, has stated that... Continue Reading →

Fulton v. City of Philadelphia: The Next “Masterpiece” from a Conservative (or is that Catholic…) Court?

By Jason Wood Can organizations who voluntarily bid on and win government service contracts, then illegally discriminate in how they provide that service, citing religious objections? Three decades ago, that question was seemingly answered in the negative by Employment Division v. Smith, with Justice Scalia concluding that “the right of free exercise does not relieve... Continue Reading →

Disabled People & Pandemic Priority

By: Aspen Miller The COVID-19 pandemic struck fear in hearts across the globe. Further, fears became justified for disabled people as their needs and vulnerabilities were overlooked by state governments, policies, local communities, and neighbors.[1] Andrew Pulrang, a freelance writer with disabilities, shared, “From the very start of the pandemic, elderly, disabled, and chronically ill... Continue Reading →

Climate Displacement of Indigenous Peoples in the United States: An International Human Rights Catastrophe Taking Place Right Here and Right Now on [Native] American Soil

By Jens Camp For many people, climate change presents somewhat of a distant concern: the concept represents something that may affect us all decades from now, but it does not currently have any clear, immediate impacts on our day-to-day interactions with the world. [1].  By contrast, for a group of five tribal nations in the... Continue Reading →

Are Indigenous Arts and Culture Protected by the Copyright Act?

By Isaac Kort-Meade In 1996, Tlingit artist Clarissa Rizal handmade an intricately woven coat using a traditional Ravenstail (Yéil Koowú) pattern. There is documented use of this pattern by the Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian people of Alaska for at least 200 years, and its use likely extends much further. The coat was registered with the... Continue Reading →

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