First Amendment Rights for the Undocumented: ICE Lawsuit Settled

By: Fallon Cochlin After a four-year court battle with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), activist Ravi Ragbir has entered into a settlement that grants him a three-year reprieve from deportation. In January 2018, The Intercept published a report that raised concerns about targeted government surveillance and enforcement of immigration rights activists. Ragbir was … Continue reading First Amendment Rights for the Undocumented: ICE Lawsuit Settled

Afghanistan Humanitarian Crisis Update

By: Lexi Carroll On August 15, 2021, Kabul tragically fell to the Taliban—the final indication that the Taliban had overthrown Afghanistan. Consequently, Afghans’ lives were immediately threatened by violence and unrest, and women’s rights and girls’ education were at risk of being dismantled. Any semblance of basic human rights were, and continue to be, in … Continue reading Afghanistan Humanitarian Crisis Update

COVID-19 Safety as a Smokescreen for Cruel Immigration Policies

By: Louis Gallegos The right to seek asylum is a fundamental human right. However, it has been severely restricted during the COVID-19 pandemic through the United States government’s use of Title 42. Title 42 is a somewhat obscure provision that grants the government the authority to “prohibit … the introduction of persons” into the United … Continue reading COVID-19 Safety as a Smokescreen for Cruel Immigration Policies

United States v. Carrillo-Lopez and the constitutionality of §1326 of the INA

By: Freeman Halle It is a criminal offense under 8 U.S.C §1326 for “removed aliens” - foreign nationals who have previously been denied admission, excluded, or removed – to reenter the United States, with limited exceptions.[1] Violations are punishable by fines, imprisonment up to two years, or both.[2] For those who were removed on account … Continue reading United States v. Carrillo-Lopez and the constitutionality of §1326 of the INA

Merits, not Marriage: The Long(er) Path of Employment-Based Immigration

By: Olivia Li “I’ve been lawfully in America since 2008. I’ve attended high school, college [and] law school here. I’ve passed [and] been admitted to the bar. I’m a public defender defending people’s constitutional rights. I still have no path to citizenship except marriage…And I had to move MOUNTAINS to get a work visa. Legal … Continue reading Merits, not Marriage: The Long(er) Path of Employment-Based Immigration