Innocent Until Proven Guilty, or Guilty Until Proven Innocent? A Constitutional Analysis of Pre-Trial Detention and Supervision

By: Jaidyn Rumpca Most people are familiar with the phrase “innocent until proven guilty.” But fewer may have considered how this protection actually applies in the United States criminal legal system. For instance, a criminal defendant is presumed innocent at trial, and the government must prove their guilt beyond a reasonable doubt; otherwise, the accused … Continue reading Innocent Until Proven Guilty, or Guilty Until Proven Innocent? A Constitutional Analysis of Pre-Trial Detention and Supervision

McCleskey’s Enduring Impact on Capital Punishment and Race

By: Princeton Wilson There is undoubtedly good news for those opposed to capital punishment. Domestic executions are at an all-time low. Only eleven people were executed in the U.S. in 2021, down from seventeen executions in 2020. The use of capital punishment is also declining on an international scale, with 170 member states of the … Continue reading McCleskey’s Enduring Impact on Capital Punishment and Race

United States v. Carrillo-Lopez and the constitutionality of §1326 of the INA

By: Freeman Halle It is a criminal offense under 8 U.S.C §1326 for “removed aliens” - foreign nationals who have previously been denied admission, excluded, or removed – to reenter the United States, with limited exceptions.[1] Violations are punishable by fines, imprisonment up to two years, or both.[2] For those who were removed on account … Continue reading United States v. Carrillo-Lopez and the constitutionality of §1326 of the INA

The Myth of “Humane” Executions

By: Madison Benson The arguments against the death penalty are numerous and diverse. There are issues of race. For example, since the reinstatement of the death penalty in 1976, 301 Black men have been executed for the murder of white victims, 178 Black men have been executed for the murder of Black victims, and 12 … Continue reading The Myth of “Humane” Executions

Cruel and Unusual: Arizona’s Push Toward Gas Chambers

By: Sarah Fisher The State of Arizona has executed 100 individuals since 1910, using methods such as electrocution, firing squad, and hanging. Beginning in 1977, most states adopted lethal injection as the primary method of execution, with many believing it to be a more humane and cost-effective alternative. However, the most current figures show that … Continue reading Cruel and Unusual: Arizona’s Push Toward Gas Chambers